Norway’s tunneling project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

The tunneling project of superlatives was originally scheduled to start at the beginning of 2019. Due to the necessary cost savings and the departure of the shipping company Hurtigruten, it is likely that the project will now be scaled down. The planned start of construction will also be postponed to 2022.

Norway's tunnel construction project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

Even the largest cruise liners of the Hurtigruten line will be able to sail the new ship tunnel in Norway. The city’s skipunnel will be the largest ship tunnel in the world.

Photo: Kystverket / Snøhetta

Norway's tunnel construction project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

At the end of the Moldefjord will be the largest The world’s tunnel under the mountains leads to the Vanylvsfjord.

Photo: Roman Scheibler / Hurtigruten

Norway's tunnel construction project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

The new tunnel links the Moldefjord the Vanylvsfjord and saves the ships the dangerous passage along the coast of the peninsula Stadlandet.

Photo: Kystverket / Snøhetta

Norway's tunnel construction project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

The new Ship tunnel saves passenger and cargo ships the huge detour around the peninsula of Stadlandet.

Photo: Kystverket / Snøhetta

Norway's tunnel construction project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

The tunnel becomes 49 m high and 36 m wide. The draft is 12 m.

Photo: Kystverket / Snøhetta

Norway's tunnel construction project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

In recent years, several routes and tunnel variants have already been virtually completed tested.

Photo: Kystverket / Snøhetta

Norway's tunnel construction project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

Photo: Kystverket / Snøhetta

Norway's tunnel construction project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

Photo: Kystverket / Snøhetta

Norway's tunnel construction project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

Photo: Kystverket / Snøhetta

Norway's tunnel construction project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

Photo: Kystverket / Snøhetta

Norway's tunnel construction project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

Photo: Kystverket / Snøhetta

Norway's tunnel construction project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

Photo: Kystverket / Snøhetta

Norway's tunnel construction project for ocean-going vessels is delayed

Photo: Kystverket / Snøhetta

It should be a tunnel of superlatives: even the largest Hurtigruten ships with 1,000 passengers on board would fit through the sea tunnel, according to the planners. After the Norwegian Parliament agreed in 2017, the construction should begin in 2019, but nothing will come of it.

Skad Skiptunnel as Safe Sea Passage

The Stad Skiptunnel is intended as an alternative to the otherwise dangerous route between Bergen and Kirkenes can be used. The prevailing currents and winds caused some ships to capsize. In this area alone, 56 shipwrecks are said to be lying on the seabed. Some other freighters and passenger ships narrowly escaped disasters. For this reason, since the 19th Century, a tunnel that is to connect the route between the end of Moldefjord and the Vanylvsfjord, in conversation. The peninsula Stadlandet, about 300 kilometers north of Bergen, came into question.

Tunnel passes through Stadlandet from fjord to fjord

The conditions there are actually ideal: A comparatively calm sea, sheltered access in the tunnel, as well as the narrowest point with only 1.7 kilometers width. On this route, the tunnel is to cross the peninsula and run through a 300 meter high mountains. The Moldefjord and the Vanylvsfjord would be securely connected. The current waterway around the fjords is considered to be one of the most dangerous routes on the entire Norwegian coast for up to 110 days a year.

The scheduled frequency of ships is about 120 passenger and cargo ships per day. With a total height of 49 meters (of which 12 meters in draft) and a width of 36 meters, the tunnel is intended to be accessible by one lane for large passenger and cargo ships. The narrow fairway does not allow any intercourse traffic, which is why prior registration will be necessary. Each vessel receives a corresponding time window for the passage. At a speed of approximately 8 knots (15 km / h) the passage takes less than 10 minutes.

Ships with up to 16,000 gross registered tons (1 gross register ton ≙ 2.8 m³), ​​including, for example, the post and Passenger ships of the Hurtigruten can easily pass the tunnel. Even for small freighters and container feeders with a loading capacity of up to 800 TEU

Skad Skiptunnel: 4 years construction time and 300 million Euro costs

Should construction of the ship’s tunnel begin a construction period of less than four years is estimated. Similar to the Gotthard Base Tunnel (Italy / Switzerland), construction would be driven by blasting and tunnel boring machines. However, the budget of about 300 million euros, of which 239 million come from government funds, was relatively small for a project of this magnitude. The Norwegian planners also had to determine this later in the project. Although at the beginning still increasing numbers of tourists on the Hurtigruten routes were a reason for the construction of the tunnel, this was disproved shortly thereafter by the shipping company itself. Recently, she turned her back on the project. Not a few were surprised by the reason: the tunnel offered no decisive advantages for their shipping traffic.

A giant project that does not work on this scale

During the planning phase it turned out that the construction was more expensive than planned could, the start of construction in early 2019 could not be maintained. In addition, the cancellation of the Hurtigruten operators led to further restrictions. Although the project has already been included in the Norwegian national transport plan, financing should also be covered. However, the Norwegian Ministry of Transport foresees external quality assurance for projects exceeding a budget of 750 million Norwegian kroner. Not only did this result in increased costs, but also that the economic benefits of the project were not as great as originally planned. As a result, work is underway to reduce costs and there is even a proposal to build a smaller tunnel.

2021 the project will be re-tendered. The Norwegian Ministry of Transport expects this to increase competition and, with the division of the route into three packages, even makes it easier for other shipping companies to get started.

admin